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Foodie Tuesday: Brazilian Black Bean Soup
May 17th, 2011 by Nancy

rain in eugene, thanks to travelpod.comThis past weekend the headliner in our local paper was this:

Not your imagination – it’s been a dreary year.”

Tells of this being the fifth coldest April on record. Tells of three forces – La Nina, the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, and high-altitude ash from the Icelandic volcano – conspiring to make us shiver and keep us that way at least through June.

I didn’t need the paper to tell me what I’ve already been through, thanks.  Springs run to the mild here in Eugene, but this has been ridiculous. When the Seattle native (me) starts complaining about the rain you know it’s been wet.

What’s this got to do with lunch?  I’ll tell you – it’s still soup-in-the-thermos season, that’s what.

Here’s a house favorite, gleaned from “Hotter than Hell” by Jane Butel (an extra-nice title for this hotter than hellparticular season).  Thankfully this soup isn’t what the book title implies – In fact it’s easy and rich, not so much “hot” as “warm”, like that “cayenne in cocoa” kind of warm.
(What? You’ve never added a dash of cayenne to cocoa? try it sometime – it will make you gasp with delight.)

BRAZILIAN BLACK BEAN SOUP

1 lb black beans
8 C water
3/4 C cooked ham, diced
1 ham bone, if you have it
4 cloves garlic, crushed
2 t salt
1/2 C diced onion
2 whole cloves
1/2 t cumin ( or to taste)
1 t to 1 T red chile powder, or to taste
Juice of one lime (2 T)

Optional toppings:
1/4 C rum (Jamaican is preferred)
4 green onions, finely chopped
1/2 C grated Monterey jack cheese OR sour cream
Lime wedges

Rinse beans and soak overnight in water to cover. Alternately, you can place the beans in a large pan of water, bring to a boil, then turn off heat, cover and let stand for a couple hours.
After they’ve soaked, drain the beans, then place in a large saucepan with the 8 cups water, ham, ham bone (if using one), garlic, salt, dice onions, cloves, cumin, chile powder, and lime juice.  Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover and simmer for 2 hours or until beans are tender and soup is thick.  Taste and adjust seasonings.  Before serving remove ham bone.

If desired you can add the rum at this point, but I’ve made this many times without it and loved it anyway.  Top off each bowl of soup with cheese or sour cream and green onions and a lime wedge.  If you’re carrying this in a thermos, bring the toppings in the condiment jar and add them just before digging in.
If you do leave out the rum, maybe you’d rather raise a glass of it to offer a toast:
to better weather – wherever it may be.”
Foodie Tuesday: Weird but good - Kale chips
May 9th, 2011 by Nancy

That's Gabriel Gil, the local (and state) Iron Chef winner 2010, on the right

Last summer my family attended a local festival where the Iron Chef of Oregon regional cook off was underway.  My daughter looked on the chefs on the stage like they were rock stars!   As we were standing around watching the cleanup (my daughter thinks watching other people clean up from cooking is interesting, but doing it is not) one of the chefs offered us kale chips left behind from her plated masterpiece.  They sounded weird and looked the part as well, but were light, crispy, and absolutely delicious.


I found the recipe today at whatscookingwithkids.com from their Earth Day post, and it is slightly more difficult than ripping open a bag of junky chips.  Even that low level of difficulty is entirely offset by the lack of guilt borne of eating kale, rather than chips, by the handful.

A little more researched uncovered many recipes for these, and they’re all the same.  So are most of the comments, all variations on this – “Wow. Really. These are GREAT.”

Assuming they aren’t all gone, they pack up and travel well for lunch to boot.

Here is the recipe:


One bunch of kale, any kind

Olive oil

Salt (I used sea salt, but anything works)


Wash, if needed, and dry the kale. Note that it’s helpful for leaves be dry, as they may otherwise steam and not get crispy.

Hold each leaf by its thick stem. Pinch the base of the leaf with the fingers of the other hand and slide them up the stem. This will separate the leaves from the stem. Place the leaves in a large bowl, tearing the larger pieces into bite sized chunks as you go.

Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with salt, then toss them with clean hands until the pieces are coated.  Don’t over-salt like I did – use it only to enhance, not dominate.

Place the leaves in a single layer on a parchment- or silicone mat-covered baking sheet. Yes you may crowd them (they shrink with cooking) but no you may not overlap them much (they’ll stick together, then steam and not get crispy).

Bake at 350 for 12-14 minutes.  They will look mostly flat and limp, but they will be light, crispy wonders.

Kale+recipes+healthy

Great photo of kale chips thanks to natalieskillercuisine.com

The weirdness continues: Kids LOVE these. They will eat more kale in one sitting than I’ve probably eaten in my lifetime, then ask for more.

Variations on a theme: Try them with cracked pepper; Seasoned salt of any kind (again only to enhance); Add a little apple cider or balsamic vinegar with the oil; How about minced garlic and/or red pepper? Try grated parmesan with the finished goods.  As with most good recipes, this one is infinitely versatile to suit your own tastes – let me know what you try!

Oh! gotta go – the oven timer’s going off…for my third sheet of chips today….

Foodie Tuesday: gluten-free "granola" bars
May 3rd, 2011 by Nancy

IMG00283-20110503-1225My husband was diagnosed as gluten intolerant about 11 years ago, which means that he is allergic to wheat, oats, barley, rye and spelt.

Naturally, this topic often comes up when we’re dining with new acquaintances (as all our old ones already know), and we’ve found that it gets, um, awkward when they start asking about the symptoms of gluten intolerance.

The awkward part is that the symptoms of gluten intolerance aren’t something anyone would like to discuss over a meal with friends (much less new acquaintances), so we’ve come up with a few code words. 

When asked “what happens if you do eat gluten by accident?”, we reply,

“Intestinal distress. Sudden, acute, intestinal distress.”

Forks pause (if only briefly) as our new acquaintances grasp our meaning, and also grasp that they probably didn’t want to know that over a plate of something yummy.

Anyway, the up side to gluten intolerance (in our household, anyway) is that I can probably attribute to it my love and appreciation of all things food.  I’ve found a world of great recipes, tricks, and substitutions I never would have otherwise, and this week’s Foodie Tuesday is one of those finds.

Until recently, finding gluten free options in a regular grocery store was challenging.  It’s thankfully much easier now as food manufacturers are creating and releasing new GF products all the time, but we always return to this basic tenet:

Homemade

Tastes

Better.

In a pinch, we’ll get the packaged goods; our earthquake kit has lots of cans and boxes that we rarely see in the regular mealtime rotation.  The rest of the time, we start from scratch.

This “granola” bar is a riff off a no-bake peanut butter bar we found in a gluten-free cookbook that was, in the early days of gluten-free living, our bible: Gluten Free Gourmet, by Bette Hagman. 

the original recipe goes like this:

Combine and heat in a saucepan until bubbly:

1 C dark corn syrup

1 C chunky peanut butter

1 C sugar

Combine in a large bowl:

6 C gluten free puffed or crisped rice cereal

1 C raisins

Pour the hot mixture over the dry, combine thoroughly, and press into a greased 9 x 13 pan.  Allow to cool, and cut into bars.

Simple, yes?  The base of the recipe looks just like a Rice Krispie square, i.e. sticky goo poured over dry cereal.  To turn this into “granola” bars, all you need to remember is the proportions, thusly:

3 C goo to 7 C dry

 

The goo:

1 C peanut, almond, or other nut butter   This is for protein, substance, heft, flavor, etc. for the finished bar.

1 C corn syrup   Light or dark, per your preference or your current inventory.

1 C sugar

Combine these three in a saucepan, and heat until bubbly.  You may add, if it works for you, seasonings:

1 t cinnamon,

1/2 t nutmeg,

1/4 t allspice, cloves, etc.

1/2 t vanilla, almond extract, maple flavoring, etc.

The dry stuff:

4 1/2 to 5 C cereal   We usually use a combination of Mesa Sunrise cereal (which I crush lightly so the flakes are about the size of dry oatmeal flakes), and Crispy Rice, a gluten free dry rice ceral.  Corn or Rice Chex also work.  The goal here is something dry with a nice crunch, as it will soften somewhat when combined with the goo.

2 to 2 1/2 C “add-ins”   This is entirely up to you and your cupboards.  I usually use about one to 1 1/2 cups dried fruit, cut into raisin-sized bits if necessary – raisins, cranberries, cherries, pineapple, banana, apple, mango, whatever suits your tastes.  The rest of the add-ins can be seeds (sesame, sunflower, pumpkin), any nuts you like, coconut, chocolate chips (mini work well here).

Mix the dry and the add-ins, pour the goo over the dry mix and combine (it will get stiff pretty quickly), and press the mixture into a greased 9 by 13″ pan.  Allow it to cool to room temperature and slice into bars.

These travel like champs (especially in lunchboxes), will keep for ages in the freezer, and are a marvelous treat for the celiacs in your life, but I love most that this recipe allows me to use up the last of many things that lurk in little bags in the back of the kitchen cabinets.   I mean to try a few “thematic” combinations:

Dried mango, pineapple, and coconut, with pecans (a tropical bar) (Hey! how ’bout rum extract in this one!)

Chocolate chips, almonds, coconut (sounds like a familiar candy bar….)

cinnamon, nutmeg, dried apple, cranberry, walnut (autumn special)

Throw some suggestions on the wall (also known as “comments”) below!

 

p.s. Thanks, Mike.  You’re my inspiration.

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